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An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

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An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Enker » Sun Nov 17, 2013 7:35 am

The following questions were asked about Tonberry and Glass Episode 1 by an American. An Englishman will now answer them.

What's an M1? Is it like an expressway? Freeway? Highway? Or an interstate...Wait. It can't be that last one. You don't have states. However, Hawaii has an interstate. Wrap your head around THAT one.

The M1 is a north–south motorway in England connecting London to Leeds, where it joins the A1(M) near Aberford. It was the first inter-urban motorway to be completed in the United Kingdom; the first road to be built to motorway standard in the country was the Preston By-pass, which later became part of the M6. The motorway is 193 miles (311 km) long and was constructed in four phases. Most of the motorway was opened between 1959 and 1968 but the southern end was extended in 1977 and the northern end was extended in 1999. It forms part of the unsigned European route E13.

Christine is said to live "in the home counties" what does that mean exactly ?

The home counties are the counties of South East England and the East of England that encircle London, but do not include the capital city itself. No exact definition of the term exists and the composition of the home counties is sometimes a matter of debate. The first use of the term "Home Counties" cited in the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1695. Charles Davenant, in An essay upon ways and means of supplying the war, wrote, "The Eleven Home Counties, which are thought in Land Taxes to pay more than their proportion, viz. Surry with Southwark, Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgshire, Kent, Essex, Norfolk, and Suffolk, Berks, Bucks, and Oxfordshire." The show begins in Kings Langley, which is in Hertfordshire (Cascade Studios is also based in Hertfordshire and Christine's voice actress comes from Kings Langley!).

Also, it says Christine's parents "left" her her current home (before it was destroyed). Does this mean they're dead?

In the UK you 'leave' somebody your property in a will. This means that both her parents are unfortunatly dead. She still has an Aunt though.

What exactly is a Motorway Restaurant Chain? I assume Little Chef's is a fictional chain? I wonder if it's like a diner or something over here.

Little Chef is a chain of roadside restaurants in the United Kingdom, founded in 1958 by entrepreneur Sam Alper, and modelled on American diners. It specialises in the "Olympic Breakfast", its version of a full english, and "Jubilee Pancakes". The restaurants are mostly located on sites on A roads and motorways, often paired with a Travelodge motel and a petrol station.

VISIT THEM ONLINE HERE http://www.littlechef.co.uk/

I'll admit I really didn't know any of the cities or locations mentioned outside of London. Curse my lack of geographical knowledge. I did laugh at the line "Nothing good ever comes from moving up north". Mainly cause I'm from the Southern part of the United States.

This is of course a referrence to the famous north/south divide, a semi-comical ribbing between the Southerners that all Northerners are farmers and idiots and that the North believes all the South to be yuppies and idiots. In Great Britain, the term North–South divide refers to the perceived economic and cultural differences between Southern England and the rest of Great Britain (Northern England, Wales and Scotland). The divide cuts through the English Midlands. Sometimes, the term is widened to include the whole United Kingdom, with Northern Ireland included as part of "the North".

In political terms, the South, and particularly the South-East (outside inner London), is largely centre-right, and supportive of the Conservative Party, while the North (particularly the towns and cities) is generally more supportive of the Labour Party as well as, in Scotland, the SNP. Support for the Liberal Democrats, and for many of the smaller parties, is generally more equally spread out. There is some criticism of this analysis in the West Country which has consistently provided a solid base for the Liberal Democrats, and also in places (particularly parts of Bristol, Devon, and Cornwall) which suffer from the same economic problems as the North.

This is another in joke because Tonberry's voice actor is very much South and Glass' voice actor is Northern, though both live in Hertfordshire (South). The two are good friends and neither is a farmer.

What is an Olympic Breakfast? Never heard of it.

The Little Chef chain serves a full english breakfast called the Olympic Breakfast which has their own spin on it.

SEE IT ON THE MENU HERE http://www.littlechef.co.uk/images/menu.pdf#page=2

I have never heard the word "Nutter" in my life. Is it the equivalent to saying someone is "Nuts" in American English?

'Nutter' essentially means mentally unstable, normally reserved for those about to do something comically stupid. A slang term.
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Re: An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Rhythm Wily » Sun Nov 24, 2013 6:05 am

Oh wow! You not only answered all of these but gave it its own section too!

1)Yeah. We have wills where you "leave" something to someone here in the US too. I guess I was surprised that she was so young and both of her parents were dead. So I wanted to just make sure that's what it meant.

2) Ah, so I was right on the diners then! I'm embarrassed to say I haven't heard of a full english, and Jubilee Pancakes either. I wouldn't mind trying them myself though. I enjoyed looking at the website. A shame none of those restaurants are available here in America for me to try out first hand.

3) a semi-comical ribbing between the Southerners that all Northerners are farmers and idiots and that the North believes all the South to be yuppies and idiots. Basically, take this stereotype and flip it for the North and South in the USA. Wow. I also didn't know there was such a political dynamic between Tonberry and Glass. That's certainly a new layer to them.

4) So nutter is basically what I thought it was. Yeah, nuts is slang over here for being mentally unstable too. I kind of like the version you use in England.
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Re: An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Enker » Fri Nov 29, 2013 5:30 pm

YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT A FULL ENGLISH BREAKFAST IS????!!!!
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Re: An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Rhythm Wily » Tue Dec 24, 2013 12:25 am

I'm sorry! No I don't! Maybe someone needs to fix one for me!XD
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Re: An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Enker » Tue Dec 24, 2013 6:12 am

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Re: An American's Questions About England (and other stuff)

Postby Rhythm Wily » Thu Jan 02, 2014 6:34 am

That actually sounds good. Haven't tasted marmalade though. Might try that. I did have scones recently and those were really good.
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